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There are numerous illustrations and photographs of various harlequins throughout the history of theatre.] (1860 at the Royal Strand) the sisters came into full ugliness and Buttoni makes his first appearance. Clorinda and Thisbe become increasingly abusive of Cinderella. The Baron awakens to the commotion, disclaiming the noisy daughters, and tells, as in , his dream of the ascending Jack-ass. In Rossini's duet they question each other and fall in love. Presumably, the people have in the meantime arrived at the Grand Ball. In 1895, at Drury Lane, Cinderella set out to the Ball in an "automotor carriage encrusted with incandescent jewels." In 1883-84 her slippers are made of "toughened glass." Frow discusses uses of advertising in pantomimes and popular songs, sex, domestic animals, and spectacular devices to attract audiences. Presumably Dandini disguised as the Prince extends the invitation to the ball. In a "Dialogued Quartett" the sisters flirt with Dandini, thinking he is the Prince, and Dandini reveals to the Baron his valet status.

Application submitted to the Lord Chamberlain 17 Dec. The play, a ballet, alternates miming dance with music in the form of recitatives, arias, and choruses. The Prince appears and the immortals entertain him with a dance while Cupid fixes an arrow in his heart. At Drury Lane, Grimaldi performed “Cinderella”, however, a critic dubbed his song and performance as “base,” and Grimaldi left Drury Lane in the fall of 1805 (98). The Nymph warns Cinderella about midnight, she enters the carriage and goes to the palace. The Prince sees Cinderella in the dress of his dream and is enchanted. The sisters return and the announcement of the Prince's search is made. She forgives the sisters and introduces them to two noblemen. The story, which follows the critique is based on Samber's translation of Perrault, where after the first night at the ball Cinderella asks Charlotte for one of her dresses but is denied and mocked as "Cinderbreech" for playing "Miss Pert." Another edition of this work was published in 1808.]. The pantomime is in manuscript, a part of the Larpent collection, no. The manuscript is five pages long and includes 14 scenes of dialogue and choruses, in couplets. Recitative by Cinderella on her scullery work, her "doom." Sc. The Baron receives news of the ball and reads the invitation that admits the Baron, his lady, and her two daughters. 5 Finetta punishes Cinderella for spurning her command. The Baroness sides with the Fairy godmother's scolding of Cinderella. He takes a nap and Fairy Butterfly gives him a vision of Cinderella. Pedro, on his way to shave the Baron, repeatedly answers the door for the Milkman, the Baker, Butcher, and then the Postman, who presents an invitation to the Prince's Ball. Produced at the Theatre Royal, Covent Garden 1875-76. George), Papillion, Queen Butterfly (Miss Emma Walters), Cinderella (Miss Amelia), Salprunella (Mr. Disher notes that this version of the folklore tale was “strangely perverted” considering Venus, instead of the fairy godmother, is responsible for Cinderella’s eventual triumph. He decorates her with a scarf and diamond ring as tokens of his love. Cinderella is in rags as the Prince's men pass by. The critique and its publication have been ascribed to Mr. He notes that the grandeur and magnificance of the grand tale has rarely been equalled, never excelled to the infinite credit of the ballet. Characters: Prince Calidore, afterwards Harlequin; Baron Pomposini, afterwards Pantaloon; Pedro, his servant, in love with Cinderella and afterwards Dandinee; the Baroness, afterwards Clown; Clotilda and Tabitha, two sisters; Cinderella, afterwards Columbine; Finetta, the Fairy Godmother to Cinderella. But Finetta drives them all away, informing the Prince that Cinderella was the beautiful maiden at the ball that he so loved, and transforming Cinderella into Columbine, the Prince into Harlequin, the Baroness into a clown, the Baron into Pantaloon, and Pedro "thou poor enamour'd loon" into Dandinee; that is, until the lost slipper be found. 14, where Finetta announces: "The slipper found, your task is o'er, / The pow'r to punish, is no more--/ But in Finetta's Temple, this pair shall prove / The joys that wait on constant love! [See also Lacy's Acting Edition under Opera, below, which includes stage directions absent from this edition. Joseph Wood), Baron Pumpolino of Montefiesco (Penson), Alidoro the Prince's Tutor (Stansbury), Dandini the Prince's Valet (Morley), Pedro the Baron's servant (Keeley), Cinderella (Miss Mary Ann Paton), Clorinda and Thisbe, daughters of the Baron (Cawse and Hughes), the Fairy Queen (Miss H. 3: A trio, suggesting a plot akin to Rossini's opening scene, with Clorinda and Thisbe complaining about dress, hair, joy, etc. The Prince laments some "Demon's opposing malice," as the chorus comments on his raging passion. Bigwiggo awakens him, after checking his large clock, but he would rather dream of her face. Cinderella appears and the Baron slaps her and so do the sisters. More work for Cinderella, though Pedro is sympathetic and helps. The Prince arrives with the slipper, though Clotilda and the Baron rage, the Prince discovers Cinderella in an instant. " The Fairy Godmother then invites everyone to see the "Grand Transformation Scene, entitled A Fairy's Wedding," with dances by the Orange Blossoms and Forget-me-nots in the Land of Purity and Truth; then the Harlequinade dancers.], by Charles Rice (1819-1880). But Cinderella has no use for reality, or rather, try as she will, she cannot make contact with reality, so she turns from poor Buttons with his human loves and hates to the impossible ideal, Prince Charming" (p. The Ugly Sisters' attempts to fit their feet into the slipper are castration attempts to have female genitals. She turns her back on Buttons and is united in a kind of deathlike way (forever after) "with an ideal combined mother-father figure, the dashing Principal Boy with the long cane and the magnificent bosom" (p. Voices call from off stage insulting her and demanding work.

130), who makes up for the missing mother and the inept father and completes her mythic dream as the real Buttons could not do.], at Drury Lane Theatre in 1702. A wrinkled old woman leading a ragged boy enters begging. Instantly they are transformed into a beautiful female and lovely page. 640).] [Excellent introductory essay and listing of forty-one pantomime/stage productions of Cinderella in England and the United States, with casts, production information, musical numbers, opening dates, theater, and number of performances; and ninety-six productions between 19, with the same kinds of information.